Art Lift - Dec 22 2020

Mia Bian

Mia, a young artist living in Seattle, is a fresh-eyed Beijing girl. When she speaks, she always speaks with a smile. Her intonations are straightforward and enthusiastic. Meeting her, you definitely would not associate her with the dark undertones of her paintings, with a deep sense of self-examination.

01. "Who the hell are you?"

Mia was not born as a painter. She studied vocal music at an early age and went to the United States to study when she was an adult, where she chose economics and fine arts. From the moment she picked up a paintbrush, her world changed.
"Painting, like music, is another language, another way of speaking to the world." Most of what flowed out of her pen were her own shadows and thoughts.
Shadows and thoughts are invisible, and their reflections into the painting are strange and beautiful. Her painting blurs the boundary between reality and dream, and the dream draws the self portrait of id and ego over and over again.
Sometimes her paintings are like a distant picture in memory. The distorted lines are mixed with emotions, intertwined with the smells from childhood.

Straight, true, naked, broken... These feelings come from Mia’s daily experiences as a new immigrant and a female artist -- the shock of culture, the eyes of others, the polite and indifferent American urban life... Her painting, the fragments of her hesitation and anger, is also a precise scalpel, which mercilessly cuts open the layers of skin and puts it against the bleeding heart, asking, "Who are you?"

02. "I've never seen such a noisy girl!"

Mia grew up in the east side of a single-family house with many unusual flowers. A deep memory for her are fruits from the trees in the garden corresponding to the distinct seasons -- summer has full-bodied red crisp jujubes and is also full of exquisite pomegranate. There is the substantial solid walnut in autumn, and in winter the snow-covered branches of Chinese flowering crabapple and frozen sweet as honey persimmon…
Mia was a mischievous child. In the summer, when she participated in the neighborhood kids' "water gun war", she made a modified water gun with small holes in the caps of plastic bottles and beat all the neighborhood kids.
According to her teacher, "I've never seen such a noisy girl!" .

In the past, when she got up in the morning, she could always see her grandfather, a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine, practicing calligraphy in front of the window at dawn. Now she is also an adept calligrapher, but she always humbly said that she was "not very good, not bad." Just like the poems and ancient articles she can easily quote now, these ancient people's skills through thousands of years have already subtly become a part of the side dream. They have become the attitude and homesickness that still linger in her mind even though she traveled to the ocean.

03. "Say the right thing and do the right thing."

It's hard to be an artist, especially a female artist.
As an Asian female artist, she has encountered many typical dilemmas. She faced implicit discrimination that focused on her appearance rather than her work, and is commonly asked, "Is that you in your nude?" She has also been verbally challenged and harassed by gallery owners.

In the face of social problems, she is deeply introspective. She admits that she has the same human frailties as everyone else, feeling sometimes false, sometimes full of emotions. She said: "I am a secular person, there is no particularity."
But she would never pretend that all this was normal, or close her eyes and pretend that all the acute social problems did not exist. She just, as always, faced her true self, and ended up saying and doing whatever she needed to, to thrive.

In her works, there is support and encouragement for women suffering from sexual harassment, satire on the conservative and almost hypocritical American art circle, anger and sorrow on human trafficking, resistance and reflection on social discipline, humanistic care for LGBT people, and deep empathy for compatriots who are also floating abroad.
Beneath her soft and slender appearance, there is an unyielding backbone.
At the beginning of her artistic career, received some wise words from her father:
"Don't pander to others, just be yourself."
"Say what you should say and do what you should do."
She did it.
Her voice is deafening in the "language" of art.

Cage Girl
Cage Girl

Cage Girl

$8,000

Artist:Mia Bian
Original Medium:  Oil Painting
Original Size:  20" x 20"

No Frame

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Sonata of Chaos
Sonata of Chaos

Sonata of Chaos

$15,000
Leaning on Myself
Leaning on Myself

Leaning on Myself

$15,000
Green Flower
Green Flower

Green Flower

$15,000
Butterflies: Reverse
Butterflies: Reverse

Butterflies: Reverse

$6,000